Demolition Cutter Takes on Steel

Demolition Cutter Takes on Steel

Brokk’s MC200 Multi Cutter packs a lot of power into a small footprint.

Whoever says hydraulics is a mature industry probably is not aware of the many innovative machines  that were introduced last month at ConExpo and last year at Bauma. The incredible capability of these machines relies heavily on cutting-edge hydraulics technology. Case in point is the MC200 Multi Cutter from Brokk AB.

Brokk is well-known for its extensive line of remote-controlled demolition machines and attachments. These machines typically work in areas too dangerous, unhealthy, or inaccessible for humans. Many times, though, Brokk machines are used in more conventional applications simply because of their compact size, impressive power, and high reliability. And because the machines are powered by electric motors instead of a gas or diesel engine, exhaust emissions are not a concern.

Brokk’s MC200 Multi Cutter

Brokk’s MC2200 Multi Cutter uses 50 tons of hydraulically generated force to cut steep pipe, beams, cable, and supply lines. 

Brokk’s MC200 Multi Cutter is actually manufactured by sister company Darda, which makes many of Brokk’s attachments. The compact MC 200 was designed for use on smaller demolition machines, so its footprint is only 10 by 13 in., with a length of 40 in. The attachment’s slim profile makes it lightweight (265 lb) and easy to maneuver in tight spaces. This is enhanced by a hydraulic rotary actuator that provides 360 deg. rotation of the cutter head.

The business end of the MC200 features hydraulic power that provides 50 tons of cutting force from a 3,900-psi hydraulic circuit. This high pressure is provided by an intensifier that amplifies hydraulic pressure of the host machine by as much as 50%. The intensifier reflects a trend in hydraulic system design. Instead of designing an entire machine to operate a higher pressure, it’s often more practical to operate a machine at conventional pressures and use an intensifier to supply only one or two circuits that actually require higher pressure.

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